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5 Old-School WSOP Events Worth Bringing Back

17 July 2015, By: Pokerjunkie.com
toddbrunson
toddbrunson

While they have the best spread out of any series in the world there have been some poker games that have fallen by the wayside in the past due to lack of popularity.

Some of these old school games have enjoyed a rebirth thanks to online poker and should possibly warrant consideration by WSOP officials.

Below are the top five old-school events worth bringing back to the WSOP.

1. Mixed Doubles

From 1979 through 1983 the WSOP held Mixed Doubles events consisting with teams of one man and one woman competing against each other.

Doyle Brunson and Starla Brodie took the 1979 version of the event and David Sklansky and Dani Kelly took the event in 1982.

With the WSOP looking to increase participation by women this would seem a logical event to reincorporate into the schedule.

This would also guarantee that there would be an open-field female champion each year as Mixed Doubles is open to all players.

Mixed Doubles would be a PR goldmine for the WSOP and is something they should consider in the near future.

2. Chinese Poker

Chinese Poker was offered at the 1995 and 1996 World Series of Poker and hasn't been spread since.

The game, while a fun variant of poker, never caught on in tournament play. However, with the rise in popularity of Open Face Chinese Poker, this could change.

Odds are that a true Chinese Poker tournament would not prove popular enough to be worth spreading.

Open Face Chinese, especially the Pineapple version, would likely draw a strong crowd spearheaded by Shaun Deeb.

Either offer this as a stand alone event with a $1,500 buy-in or as a High Roller event for the pros with a price tag of $25,000 or greater.

3. Five Card Draw

Five Card Draw poker is nearly extinct in the live tournament world and hasn't been spread as a stand-alone poker game at the World Series of Poker since 1982.

That year David Sklansky defeated Michael Conti for the title and $15,500.

Five Card Draw has been included in Dealer's Choice games in the last couple of years but has yet to garner consideration otherwise.

This game would be extinct if not for online poker. There is enough of a following online that official might want to consider a single offering on a future schedule.

While Draw events have been limit in the past, there's no reason why they couldn't offer a PL or NL version of the game.

PL Five Card Draw has been popular online and could draw a solid crowd at the WSOP.

4. Limit Omaha Hi

While PL Omaha and Omaha Hi-Lo are staples of the WSOP schedule Limit Omaha Hi hasn't been offered since 2003. One reason that the game was dropped in the past was due to attendance and the explosion of No-Limit Texas Hold'em.

Certain events had to give way to the more popular variant back then but now that the WSOP spreads nearly 80 events a year including international events, it may be time to return this game to the schedule.

This would be a great game for those that love to play Omaha but don't want the wild swings associated with the PL version.

Another option would be to maybe offer a mixed Omaha event with Limit Omaha and PLO or maybe Limit Omaha, PLO and O8.

5. A-5 Lowball

Another game that was a casualty of the Poker Boom was A-5 Lowball. Also known as California Lowball this game was popular up until 2003.

The last time it was spread Men Nguyen took down the lightly attended event. After Chris Moneymaker won the Main Event that year the event was removed in favor of Hold'em.

A-5 Lowball has been offered in some mixed games such as 10-Game and Dealer's Choice but now is a good time to try out perhaps a $1,500 stand-alone event.

Standard A-5 Lowball is a triple draw game with the objective to make the lowest hand. Straights and flushes don't count so the wheel (ace through five straight) is the best hand.

Another option would be to offer this game as a NL single-draw tournament. Start out with a single stand-alone event and test the popularity and go from there.

If it doesn't draw well, pun intended, then go back to only using the variant in mixed games.

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